Session 562 - Cannabinoid Pharmacology and Abuse

562.06 / NN3 - Normalization of Goal-Directed Behaviors Associated with Chronic Cannabis Use in Bipolar Disorder
 

Presenter at Poster
Tue., Nov. 15, 2022 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Session Type
Poster
Grant Support
R01DA043535
Citation 
*A. MIRANDA, A. MINASSIAN, J. W. YOUNG, W. PERRY; 
Psychiatry, UCSD, San Diego, CA. Normalization of Goal-Directed Behaviors Associated with Chronic Cannabis Use in Bipolar Disorder. Program No. 562.06. 2022 Neuroscience Meeting Planner. Chicago, IL: Society for Neuroscience, 2022. Online.
Authors
*A. MIRANDA, A. MINASSIAN, J. W. YOUNG, W. PERRY; 
Psychiatry, UCSD, San Diego, CA
Disclosures
 A. Miranda: None. A. Minassian: None. J.W. Young:None. W. Perry: None.
Abstract
Cannabis use is highly prevalent in people with bipolar disorder (BD), with many reporting using cannabis to ameliorate symptoms. These symptoms include deficits in goal-directed behaviors (i.e., decision-making and hyper-motivation) and cognitive function (i.e., attention and learning). However, chronic cannabis use is also associated with cognitive impairment, thus it is unclear to what degree cannabis is useful in ameliorating symptoms of BD. Here, we determined the effects of chronic cannabis use on goal-directed behavior and cognition that are impaired in people with BD. We recruited BD+ and BD- participants that were either cannabis users (C+) or non-users (C-). We performed a 2X2 ANOVA on interim data using BD and cannabis use as between-subjects factors on the 4 diagnostic groups: BD-/C- (n=25), BD-/C+(n-21), BD+/C- (n=8) and BD+/C+ (n=12). Participants were tested with a cognitive battery measuring risky decision-making (Iowa Gambling Task; IGT), motivation (Progressive Ratio Breakpoint Ratio Task; PRBT), reward learning (Probabilistic Learning Task; PLT) and sustained attention (5-C CPT). Overall, cannabis users were younger than non-users. Using age as a covariate, we observed BD x cannabis interaction effects on the IGT and PRBT. BD+/C+ participants showed less risk-prone behaviors on the IGT (F (1,63), p=.015, ES=.09) and normalized motivation on the PRBT (F (1,61), p=.045, ES=.065). We observed moderate effects of cannabis on punishment sensitivity (F (1,63), p=0.059, ES=0.055) and sustained attention (F (1,48), p=0.056, ES=0.074). Chronic cannabis use was associated with a modest improvement in some cognitive functions. Cannabis use was also associated with a normalization of risky decision making and effortful motivation in people with BD, but not healthy participants. Thus, chronic cannabis use may have uniquely beneficial effects in people with BD. Previous studies suggest that some people with BD have increased dopaminergic activity due to a reduced dopamine transporter expression. Chronic cannabis use has been shown to reduce dopamine release, thus chronic cannabis use may result in a return to dopamine homeostasis in people with BD and consequently normalizing their deficits in goal directed behaviors. We are engaged in additional studies that explore this potential dopaminergic/endocannabinoid mechanism.
Presenter at Poster
Tue., Nov. 15, 2022 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Session Type
Poster
Grant Support
R01DA043535
Citation 
*A. MIRANDA, A. MINASSIAN, J. W. YOUNG, W. PERRY; 
Psychiatry, UCSD, San Diego, CA. Normalization of Goal-Directed Behaviors Associated with Chronic Cannabis Use in Bipolar Disorder. Program No. 562.06. 2022 Neuroscience Meeting Planner. Chicago, IL: Society for Neuroscience, 2022. Online.
Authors
*A. MIRANDA, A. MINASSIAN, J. W. YOUNG, W. PERRY; 
Psychiatry, UCSD, San Diego, CA
Disclosures
 A. Miranda: None. A. Minassian: None. J.W. Young:None. W. Perry: None.
Abstract
Cannabis use is highly prevalent in people with bipolar disorder (BD), with many reporting using cannabis to ameliorate symptoms. These symptoms include deficits in goal-directed behaviors (i.e., decision-making and hyper-motivation) and cognitive function (i.e., attention and learning). However, chronic cannabis use is also associated with cognitive impairment, thus it is unclear to what degree cannabis is useful in ameliorating symptoms of BD. Here, we determined the effects of chronic cannabis use on goal-directed behavior and cognition that are impaired in people with BD. We recruited BD+ and BD- participants that were either cannabis users (C+) or non-users (C-). We performed a 2X2 ANOVA on interim data using BD and cannabis use as between-subjects factors on the 4 diagnostic groups: BD-/C- (n=25), BD-/C+(n-21), BD+/C- (n=8) and BD+/C+ (n=12). Participants were tested with a cognitive battery measuring risky decision-making (Iowa Gambling Task; IGT), motivation (Progressive Ratio Breakpoint Ratio Task; PRBT), reward learning (Probabilistic Learning Task; PLT) and sustained attention (5-C CPT). Overall, cannabis users were younger than non-users. Using age as a covariate, we observed BD x cannabis interaction effects on the IGT and PRBT. BD+/C+ participants showed less risk-prone behaviors on the IGT (F (1,63), p=.015, ES=.09) and normalized motivation on the PRBT (F (1,61), p=.045, ES=.065). We observed moderate effects of cannabis on punishment sensitivity (F (1,63), p=0.059, ES=0.055) and sustained attention (F (1,48), p=0.056, ES=0.074). Chronic cannabis use was associated with a modest improvement in some cognitive functions. Cannabis use was also associated with a normalization of risky decision making and effortful motivation in people with BD, but not healthy participants. Thus, chronic cannabis use may have uniquely beneficial effects in people with BD. Previous studies suggest that some people with BD have increased dopaminergic activity due to a reduced dopamine transporter expression. Chronic cannabis use has been shown to reduce dopamine release, thus chronic cannabis use may result in a return to dopamine homeostasis in people with BD and consequently normalizing their deficits in goal directed behaviors. We are engaged in additional studies that explore this potential dopaminergic/endocannabinoid mechanism.


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